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Anställningsskyddets avsedda och oavsedda konsekvenser

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Anställningsskydd, Arbetsmarknad, Georgios Sideras, LAS, Linda Weidenstedt, Lotta Stern, Sociologi
Anställningsskyddets avsedda och oavsedda konsekvenser
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Abstract

Lagen om anställningsskydd är omdebatterad och skapar friktioner på svensk arbetsmarknad. Å ena sidan finns arbetsgivare som vill ha flexibla företag och rätten att leda och fördela arbetet för att främja verksamheten. Å andra sidan finns arbetstagare som vill ha trygga anställningar och rätt till en icke-godtycklig behandling. På aggregerad nivå får lagstiftningens avsedda och oavsedda konsekvenser förhållandevis mycket utrymme i debatterna såväl som inom forskningen, där studier exempelvis visar att ett strikt anställningsskydd hämmar företagens produktivitet. Mer sällan ställs frågan hur lagstiftningen tillämpas och upplevs fungera lokalt och i praktiken, det vill säga ute på företagen.

Den här studien syftar till att bidra med sådan konkret och lokal kunskap i syfte att undersöka avsedda och oavsedda konsekvenser av anställningsskyddets utformande i företagens dagliga verksamhet. Frågan undersöks genom tolv intervjuer med företagsledare i medelstora tillverkande företag med erfarenhet av att avsluta anställningar. Företagsledarna fick berätta om vad som hände, hur och när processen initierades, och när – men också hur – de upplevde att processen fungerade.

Resultaten visar att företagsledarna principiellt har en positiv inställning till anställningsskydd, men upplever att lagstiftningen inte fungerar väl i praktiken. Exempelvis står turordningsreglerna i konflikt med företagsledningens fokus på att vid arbetsbrist behålla rätt kompetens. Vidare menar de att avslut av anställningar på grund av personliga skäl är näst intill omöjligt.

Stern, L., Weidenstedt, L. & Sideras, G. (2018). Anställningsskyddets avsedda och oavsedda konsekvenser. (Arbetsmarknadsprogrammet, rapport nr. 7) Stockholm: Ratio.


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