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Working Paper. No 310: Crowding out or Knowledge Spillovers: The Wind Power Industry´s Effect on Related Energy Machinery

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Företagandets villkor, Jonas Grafström, Miljöekonomi, Nationalekonomi
jg_Crowding_out_or_knowledge_spillovers_310
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Abstract

There is a risk that if a government adopts a R&D spending policy directed towards wind power technology crowding out of other technologies might occur due to fiscal constraints and changes in relative prices. The purpose of this paper is to provide a backward-looking analysis of how the accumulation of wind energy patents and public R&D spending affected the domestic and neighboring country output of granted patents in the “related energy machinery field”. The econometric analysis, a Poisson fixed-effects estimator based on the Hausman, Hall and Griliches (1984) method, relies on a data set consisting of eight countries in Western Europe with the highest rates of patent production in the field of wind power between 1978 and 2008. The results show that an accumulation of a national wind power stock is a statistically significant negative determinant of a country’s related energy machinery patenting outcomes. However, no crowding out effects of public R&D spending were found.

Grafström, J. (2018). Crowding out or Knowledge Spillovers: The Wind Power Industry´s Effect on Related Energy Machinery. (Ratio Working Paper No. 310)


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