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Disruptive and paradoxical roles in the sharing economies

PublicationArticle (with peer review)
Christina Öberg, Delningsekonomi, sharing economy

Abstract

The sharing economy could be said to disrupt who does what in exchanges. This paper categorises the roles played by users, providers, and platforms in different interpretations of the sharing economy. It asks: What different roles do the users, providers, and platforms play in the sharing economy? And: How do the roles differ in various interpretations of the sharing economy? The paper classifies the different interpretations based on their market/non-market logic and concludes that roles are more extensive for users and providers in non-market logic interpretations, while market logic suggests that the platform acts more roles. The user is, despite the peer-to-peer connotation of the sharing economy, often quite passive. Contributions are made to the emerging literature on the sharing economy through highlighting its many different interpretations, where roles help to systematise these. The paper furthermore contributes to the literature on roles through highlighting them as transitory and expanding beyond expectations related to digitalisation. Practically, the systematisation of roles helps to navigate among various business model designs and makes informed decisions when launching platforms in the sharing economy. Additionally, the focus on roles raises important questions on risk sharing, resource provisions, and the creation of value for each participating party.

Öberg, C. (2021). Disruptive and paradoxical roles in the sharing economies. International Journal of Innovation Management, 25(4).


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Trust and the sharing economy
Article (with peer review)Publication
Pelgander, L., Öberg, C., & Barkenäs, L.
Publication year

(2022).

Published in

Digital Business, 100048.

Abstract

Trust is intimately connected with relational interactions, but does it also have a role to play in transactional exchanges? How would it differ? While trust has been discussed extensively in sharing economy research, the focus has been on trust cues created in exchanges between strangers, thereby approaching trust empirically rather than theoretically. Focusing on user trust, this paper investigates how trust constructs from relational interactions manifest in the sharing economy. This paper bridges sharing economy research with trust as a theoretical construct to investigate the well-established variables of ability, benevolence and integrity as components of trust in the sharing economy. The paper is based on a questionnaire survey of 175 users of Uber’s co-driving service UberPop. Descriptive and regression analyses were conducted focusing on user trust in the platform and providers. The findings indicate how trust in transactional exchanges is shaped differently compared with trust in relational interactions. User trust in providers, which diminishes over time, is based on emotional traits, while user trust in the platform is based on functional components. The platform and providers thereby complement each other in terms of the trust created. This paper contributes to research on trust by focusing on trust in transactional exchanges, and to research on the sharing economy by investigating trust based on theoretical constructs.

Industrial Marketing
BookPublication
Fotiadis, T., Lindgreen, A., Siomkos, G. J., Öberg, C., & Folinas, D.
Publication year

2022

Published in

Industrial Marketing. SAGE.

Abstract

An introductory textbook on industrial marketing and supply chain management that discusses industrial products and pricing, as well as key topics such as co-creation of value, big data, innovation, green practices and CSR.

The textbook includes:

The marketing philosophy on industrial markets
The characteristics of industrial markets
The marketing mix and the product life cycle
The issues surrounding distribution and operations including value creation, business relationships and networks
Case studies and mini case studies (vignettes)

This textbook is suitable for students studying industrial marketing and other related courses at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Thomas Fotiadis is an Associate Professor of Marketing and Head of the Marketing Laboratory in the Department of Production and Management Engineering, School of Engineering at Democritus University of Thrace, Greece.

Adam Lindgreen is Professor and Head of Department of Marketing at Copenhagen Business School, Denmark and Extraordinary Professor at University of Pretoria’s Gordon Institute of Business Science, South Africa.

George J. Siomkos is Professor of Marketing at the Athens University of Economics & Business (AUEB), Director of the MSc Program in Services Management and previously Dean of the School of Business, AUEB, Greece.

Christina Öberg is Professor at CTF Service Research Center, Karlstad University and associated with the Ratio Institute, Sweden. 

Dimitris Folinas is Professor in the Department of Supply Chain Management at International Hellenic University, Greece.

The identity crisis of sharing: from the co-op economy to the urban sharing economy phenomenon
Book chapterPublication
Geißinger, A., Pelgander, L., & Öberg, C.
Publication year

2021

Published in

In A Modern Guide to the Urban Sharing Economy. Edward Elgar Publishing.

Abstract

This chapter explores the disparities between the two main dimensions of the contemporary Sharing Economy. On the one side, non-market collaborative economy actors are shaping the community orientation. On the other side, the market-oriented platform economy utilizes commercial interest in cities based on the scalability of ‘peer’ users and providers. It is within this tension that the chapter aims to illustrate how today’s sharing economy got into an identity crisis. By drawing on the literature of organizational identity, we utilize five different sharing economy actors across the market/non-market continuum in Sweden to discover who they are and what societal impact they envision. The chapter discusses how over time, sharing economy actors seem to have moved from a co-operative, non-commercial model of sharing to instead focus on a commercial sharing approach in a predominant urban setting. We end the chapter by initiating a general debate about the future of the peer-to-peer sharing idea.

Buy the book here.

Geißinger, A., Pelgander, L., & Öberg, C. (2021). The identity crisis of sharing: from the co-op economy to the urban sharing economy phenomenon. In A Modern Guide to the Urban Sharing Economy. Edward Elgar Publishing.

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