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Entreprenörskap och inkomstspridning – hur företagare påverkar ojämlikheten

PublicationArticle (without peer review)
Daniel Halvarsson, Entreprenörskap, Företagandets villkor, Inkomstfördelning, Karl Wennberg, Martin Korpi

Abstract

Forskningen om inkomstojämlikhet har utvecklat modeller för att analysera inkomstspridning men har underlåtit att inkludera entreprenörskap – ett allt vanligare yrkesval. Vi undersöker hur antalet och typen av företagare påverkar inkomstskillnaderna i Sverige. Vi finner en tydlig polariseringseffekt av andelen företagare i arbetskraften: Egenföretagare ökar inkomstspridningen genom att flertalet har låga inkomster relativt löntagare, medan det omvända gäller för aktiebolagsföretagare. Påverkan sker således främst i svansarna av fördelningen, och den tycks vara som störst för egenföretagare.

Halvarsson, D., Korpi, M., & Wennberg, K. (2017). Entreprenörskap och inkomstspridning – hur företagare påverkar ojämlikheten. Ekonomisk debatt, 45(1), 53-59.


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