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No Gift and Inheritance Tax

PublicationArticle (with peer review)
Arvsskatt, Familjeföretag, Företagandets villkor, Lars-Göran Sund, Per-Olof Bjuggren, Succession

Abstract

Sweden abandoned the gift and inheritance tax in late 2004. One reason was that the government wished to enhance transfer of ownership of shares in family-owned businesses from the older to the younger generation and within the family. Anticipated outcomes of amendments in tax law are, however, not always fulfilled. This paper reports on a survey study of 143 Swedish small to medium-sized family businesses. The study is focused on companies and families that have carried out an intergenerational succession (some partly) during the lifetime of the older generation (127). Only in a few instances was the transfer of shares made in another way, i.e. six intestate inheritances and ten sales to an external person. According to the survey results abandoning the gift and inheritance tax is no quick .x. A succession within the family has still to be prepared and planned. Further, a transfer of the shares, for example to a daughter during the life time of the incumbent cannot always be made through a gift. The older generation may still require financial compensation in order to uphold their standard of living or compensate siblings who do not receive shares. A sale to a child at less than market value is still partly capital gains taxed. Even though having no gift and inheritance tax can be beneficial it nonetheless cannot produce miracles.
We conclude that more efforts should be made concerning taxation of intergenerational transfer of family-owned businesses, in order to smooth the process, which hopefully will also be recognized by the EU Commission in its recommendations.

Sund, L-G., & Bjuggren, P-O. (2013). No Gift and Inheritance Tax: No Problems Left for Succession of Family-Owned Businesses? European Business Law Review, 24(1), 149-159.

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No Gift and Inheritance Tax
Artikel (med peer review)Publication
Sund, L-G., & Bjuggren, P-O.
Publication year

2013

Published in
Abstract

Sweden abandoned the gift and inheritance tax in late 2004. One reason was that the government wished to enhance transfer of ownership of shares in family-owned businesses from the older to the younger generation and within the family. Anticipated outcomes of amendments in tax law are, however, not always fulfilled. This paper reports on a survey study of 143 Swedish small to medium-sized family businesses. The study is focused on companies and families that have carried out an intergenerational succession (some partly) during the lifetime of the older generation (127). Only in a few instances was the transfer of shares made in another way, i.e. six intestate inheritances and ten sales to an external person. According to the survey results abandoning the gift and inheritance tax is no quick .x. A succession within the family has still to be prepared and planned. Further, a transfer of the shares, for example to a daughter during the life time of the incumbent cannot always be made through a gift. The older generation may still require financial compensation in order to uphold their standard of living or compensate siblings who do not receive shares. A sale to a child at less than market value is still partly capital gains taxed. Even though having no gift and inheritance tax can be beneficial it nonetheless cannot produce miracles.
We conclude that more efforts should be made concerning taxation of intergenerational transfer of family-owned businesses, in order to smooth the process, which hopefully will also be recognized by the EU Commission in its recommendations.

Recruitment of scarce competences to rural regions: Policy perspectives
Article (with peer review)Publication
Nyström, K.
Publication year

2021

Published in

Review of regional research.

Abstract

This paper studies the perceived difficulty of recruiting scarce competencies to rural regions. Furthermore, the role of policy in facilitating and enhancing recruitment to and better skills matching in rural regions is discussed. Based on a survey targeted to the business sections of Swedish municipalities, the results show that recruitment is perceived to be difficult in both rural and nonrural regions and that the difficulty of recruiting for the right skills results in a lack of skills matching and constitutes an obstacle to growth. Rural regions located close to urban areas can to some extent mitigate these recruitment problems, and their locations pose less of a barrier in recruitment processes compared to those of remotely located rural regions.

Which policies can help remedy recruitment problems faced in rural regions? In both rural and nonrural regions, incentives for writing off student debt and relocation support for accompanying persons and tandem recruitment are perceived to be the most promising policies. Rural regions are more receptive to the implementation of such policies. Finally, the need for flexibility and policies that can be adapted to the regional demand for labour are stressed.

Nyström, K. Recruitment of scarce competences to rural regions: Policy perspectives. Rev Reg Res (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10037-021-00155-

The Effect of Marshallian and Jacobian Knowledge Spillovers on Jobs in the Solar, Wind and Energy Efficiency Sector
Article (with peer review)Publication
Aldieri, L., Grafström, J., & Vinci, C. P.
Publication year

2021

Published in

Energies, 14(14), 4269.

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to establish if Marshallian and Jacobian knowledge spillovers affect job creation in the green energy sector. Whether these two effects exist is important for the number of jobs created in related fields and jobs pushed away in other sectors. In the analysis, the production efficiency, in terms of jobs and job spillovers, from inventions in solar, wind and energy efficiency, is explored through data envelopment analysis (DEA), based on the Malmquist productivity index, and tobit regression. A panel dataset of American and European firms over the period of 2002–2017 is used. The contribution to the literature is to show the role of the spillovers from the same technology sector (Marshallian externalities), and of the spillovers from more diversified activity (Jacobian externalities). Since previous empirical evidence concerning the innovation effects on the production efficiency is yet weak, the paper attempts to bridge this gap. The empirical findings suggest negative Marshallian externalities, while Jacobian externalities have no statistical impact on the job creation process. The findings are of strategic importance for governments who are developing industrial strategies for renewable energy.

Aldieri, L., Grafström, J., & Vinci, C. P. (2021). The Effect of Marshallian and Jacobian Knowledge Spillovers on Jobs in the Solar, Wind and Energy Efficiency Sector. Energies, 14(14), 4269.

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