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Human Capital Theory and Internal Migration: Do Average Outcomes Distort Our View of Migrant Motives?

PublicationArticle (with peer review)
A. V. William Clark, Arbetskraftens rörlighet, Företagandets villkor, Humankapital, Martin Korpi, Migration, Urbanisering

Abstract

By modelling the distribution of percentage income gains for movers in Sweden, using multinomial logistic regression, this paper shows that those receiving large pecuniary returns from migration are primarily those moving to the larger metropolitan areas and those with higher education, and that there is much more variability in income gains than what is often assumed in models of average gains to migration. This suggests that human capital models of internal migration often overemphasize the job and income motive for moving, and fail to explore where and when human capital motivated migration occurs.

Related content: Working paper No. 213

Korpi, M., & Clark, W. A. V. (2017). Human capital theory and internal migration: do average outcomes distort our view of migrant motives?Migration letters: an international journal of migration studies14(2), 237.


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