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Is China different? A meta-analysis of China’s financial sector development

PublicationArticle (with peer review)
China, Christer Ljungwall, Economic Growth, Financial development, Företagandets villkor, Meta-analysis, Patrik Gustavsson Tingvall

Abstract

We examine whether China has benefited more from financial development than other countries. The results show that financial development has been less significant for growth in China than in other countries, even when China is compared with other transition economies.

Ljungwall, C., & Gustavsson Tingvall, P. (2013). Is China different? A meta-analysis of China’s financial sector development. Applied Economics Letters, 20(7), 715-718. DOI: 10.1080/13504851.2012.734592


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