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Making Sense of Local Customer Relationships in Cross-border Acquisitions

PublicationBook chapter
Christina Öberg, Företagandets villkor, Förvärv, Internationalisering, Kundrelationer

Abstract

Excerpt: This chapter deals with sensemaking in the context of customer relationships in cross-border acquisitions. Its specific focus is on the local customer relationships of acquired parties, highlighting the differences in sensemaking that exist between local customers, local representatives of the acquired parties and strategic managers of the acquirer. Sensemaking is concerned with how individuals understand a situation (Weick 1987), which in the context of this chapter refers to both the acquisition and subsequent integration.

Öberg, C. 2017. Making Sense of Local Customer Relationships in Cross-border Acquisitions. In M. Fuchs, S. Henn, M. Franz, & R. Mudambi (Eds.), Managing Culture and Interspace in Cross-border Investments: Building a Global Company(pp. 158-167). New York, NY: Routledge.

Excerpt: This chapter deals with sensemaking in the context of customer relationships in cross-border acquisitions. Its specific focus is on the local customer relationships of acquired parties, highlighting the differences in sensemaking that exist between local customers, local representatives of the acquired parties and strategic managers of the acquirer. Sensemaking is concerned with how individuals understand a situation (Weick 1987), which in the context of this chapter refers to both the acquisition and subsequent integration.


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