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Partier i kommunpolitiken: En kunskapsöversikt om partier, makt och legitimitet

PublicationBook
Företagandets villkor, Gissur Ó. Erlingsson, Kommun, Politiska partier

Abstract

Håller vi på att kommunalisera den lokala demokratin? Varför minska antalet medlemmar i de politiska partierna? Och vad vet vi om partiernas roll i styrning och ledning av kommuner, landsting och regioner? Vår förhoppning är att kunskapsöversikten ska inspirera till samtal och debatt om partierna i kommunpolitiken.

Erlingsson, G.Ó. (2008). Partier i kommunpolitiken: En kunskapsöversikt om partier, makt och legitimitet. Stockholm. Sveriges kommuner och landsting.

Based on content

Why Do Party Systems Tend to Be So Stable?
Article (with peer review)Publication
Erlingsson, G.Ó.
Publication year

2009

Abstract

The purpose of this research note is to demonstrate the usefulness of rational choice models in making party‐system stability intelligible. First, the ‘problem of collective action among potential party‐entrepreneurs’ makes it puzzling that new political parties emerge at all. Secondly, if the original collective‐action problem is overcome somehow, the ‘problem of voter coordination’ makes it hard for new parties to attract voters. Finally, established competitors have incentives and resources to hold newcomers back. I conclude by maintaining that simple, well‐known rational choice models explain the empirical observation by Lipset and Rokkan (1967) that party systems tend to be ‘frozen’. Instead, the genuinely puzzling thing is why new political parties emerge and gain support at all.

Why Do Party Systems Tend to Be So Stable?
Artikel (med peer review)Publication
Erlingsson, G.Ó.
Publication year

2009

Published in

Bifröst Journal of Social Science

Abstract

The purpose of this research note is to demonstrate the usefulness of rational choice models in making party‐system stability intelligible. First, the ‘problem of collective action among potential party‐entrepreneurs’ makes it puzzling that new political parties emerge at all. Secondly, if the original collective‐action problem is overcome somehow, the ‘problem of voter coordination’ makes it hard for new parties to attract voters. Finally, established competitors have incentives and resources to hold newcomers back. I conclude by maintaining that simple, well‐known rational choice models explain the empirical observation by Lipset and Rokkan (1967) that party systems tend to be ‘frozen’. Instead, the genuinely puzzling thing is why new political parties emerge and gain support at all.

The Spatial Diffusion of Party Entrepreneurs in Swedish Local Politics
Article (with peer review)Publication
Erlingsson, G.Ó.
Publication year

2008

Published in
Abstract

Theoretical expectations predict instances of party formation to be unusual. It is therefore puzzling that new ‘non-national’ parties became increasingly common in Swedish local councils between 1973 and 2002. This article sets out to answer why party formation became an increasingly popular strategy throughout these years. I show that previous research has not provided satisfactory answers, and argue that existing theories are of limited use explaining this development. It is suggested that a diffusion mechanism may explain why new parties became increasingly common in Swedish local councils. Theoretically, it is argued that an entrepreneur who creates a new party inspires potential entrepreneurs in neighboring municipalities to repeat this at later points in time. A geographical clustering of municipalities where these parties exist is therefore expected. Support is found for this assertion. The result is important since it outperforms the alternative ‘local contextual’, socioeconomic hypotheses previously tested in this empirical setting.

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