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Ratio Working Paper No. 315: Habitual Entrepreneurs in the Making: How Labour Market Rigidity and Employment Affects Entrepreneurial Re-entry

PublicationWorking paper
Anne-Sophie Larsson, employment, Habitual entrepreneurship, institutional context, Karl Wennberg, Kun Fu, multilevel modelling
Habitual Entrepreneurs in the Making
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Abstract

We investigate the impact of country-level labour market regulations on the re-entry decision of experienced entrepreneurs, whereby they become habitual entrepreneurs. Multilevel logit models on entry decisions among 15,709 individuals in 29 European countries show that labour market regulations have a positive influence on the decision to re-enter into entrepreneurship. This positive impact is stronger among individuals holding wage jobs at the time of re-entry compared to those that do not. Our results indicate that novice and habitual entrepreneurs may respond very differently to labour market rigidity. We discuss and provide tentative explanations for these differences, and outline potential policy implications.

Wennberg, K., Fu, K. & Larsson, A-S. (2018). Habitual Entrepreneurs in the Making: How Labour Market Rigidity and Employment Affects Entrepreneurial Re-entry. (Ratio Working Paper No. 315)

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Ratio Working Paper No. 315: Habitual Entrepreneurs in the Making: How Labour Market Rigidity and Employment Affects Entrepreneurial Re-entry
Working paperPublication
Wennberg, K., Fu, K. & Larsson, A-S.
Publication year

2018

Published in

Ratio Working Paper

Abstract

We investigate the impact of country-level labour market regulations on the re-entry decision of experienced entrepreneurs, whereby they become habitual entrepreneurs. Multilevel logit models on entry decisions among 15,709 individuals in 29 European countries show that labour market regulations have a positive influence on the decision to re-enter into entrepreneurship. This positive impact is stronger among individuals holding wage jobs at the time of re-entry compared to those that do not. Our results indicate that novice and habitual entrepreneurs may respond very differently to labour market rigidity. We discuss and provide tentative explanations for these differences, and outline potential policy implications.

Ratio Working Paper No. 315: Habitual Entrepreneurs in the Making: How Labour Market Rigidity and Employment Affects Entrepreneurial Re-entry
Working paperPublication
Wennberg, K., Fu, K. & Larsson, A-S.
Publication year

2018

Published in

Ratio Working Paper

Abstract

We investigate the impact of country-level labour market regulations on the re-entry decision of experienced entrepreneurs, whereby they become habitual entrepreneurs. Multilevel logit models on entry decisions among 15,709 individuals in 29 European countries show that labour market regulations have a positive influence on the decision to re-enter into entrepreneurship. This positive impact is stronger among individuals holding wage jobs at the time of re-entry compared to those that do not. Our results indicate that novice and habitual entrepreneurs may respond very differently to labour market rigidity. We discuss and provide tentative explanations for these differences, and outline potential policy implications.

Ratio Working Paper No. 349: Industrial conflict in essential services in a new era – Swedish rules in a comparative perspective
Working paperPublication
Karlson, N.
Publication year

2021

Published in

Ratio Working Paper

Abstract

This paper examines whether the Swedish regulatory system of dealing with industrial conflicts that affect essential services need an update or reform. Are the existing rules effective in a world where many essential services are upheld by many interdependent agents in complex systems where every single node becomes critical for the functioning of the system, and where the essential service activities could be either private or public? A comparative study is conducted with the corresponding regulatory systems of the United Kingdom, Germany, and Denmark.
The conclusion is that Sweden is a special case. The Swedish protection against and readiness in dealing with societally harmful industrial conflicts in essential services is weaker than in the countries of comparison. Just as in relation to other threats to essential services, it is not sustainable to claim that just because such a threat is not currently present, there would be no need for preparedness.
There are many alternative ways to handle this. Desirable methods should both prevent harmful conflicts from erupting and end conflicts that have grown harmful to society at a later stage. The labour market organisations should have a mutual interest in reforming the rules.

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