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Reaping Value from Digitalization in Swedish Manufacturing Firms

PublicationBook chapter
Digitalisering, Företagandets villkor, Karl Wennberg, Magnus Mähring, Robert Demir, Tillverkningsindustri

Abstract

Excerpt: In this chapter, we take a fresh look at what is actually happening in the area of digitalization, with a particular focus on the Swedish manufacturing sector. […] We particularly focus upon patterns in the ways in which they seek to develop innovations and explore new business models from their activities related to product sensors and wireless data, cloud-based data warehouses, computer-aided manufacturing and 3D printing, big data technologies, and application programming interfaces (APIs). Our findings suggest that while many Swedish industrial firms have developed a strong edge through a combination of high-quality products, international presence, and decentralization, the latter in particular poses challenges when it comes to digital transformation. Digitalization may necessitate large investments across business segments, standardisation, and knowledge sharing regarding both customers and digital solutions in order to create new customer offerings. Points for reflection are then discussed, along with recommendations for scholars that are seeking to develop new and relevant knowledge by studying the transformation of Swedish industry, as well as for managers seeking to benchmark their digitalization activities to others.

Mähring, M., Wennberg, K., & Demir, R. (2018). Reaping Value from Digitalization in Swedish Manufacturing Firms: Untapped Opportunities? In P. Andersson, S. Movin, M. Mähring, R. Teigland, & K. Wennberg (Eds.), Managing Digital Transformation (pp. 39-63). Stockholm: SIR.

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Reaping Value from Digitalization in Swedish Manufacturing Firms
BokkapitelPublication
Mähring, M., Wennberg, K., & Demir, R.
Publication year

2018

Abstract

Excerpt: In this chapter, we take a fresh look at what is actually happening in the area of digitalization, with a particular focus on the Swedish manufacturing sector. […] We particularly focus upon patterns in the ways in which they seek to develop innovations and explore new business models from their activities related to product sensors and wireless data, cloud-based data warehouses, computer-aided manufacturing and 3D printing, big data technologies, and application programming interfaces (APIs). Our findings suggest that while many Swedish industrial firms have developed a strong edge through a combination of high-quality products, international presence, and decentralization, the latter in particular poses challenges when it comes to digital transformation. Digitalization may necessitate large investments across business segments, standardisation, and knowledge sharing regarding both customers and digital solutions in order to create new customer offerings. Points for reflection are then discussed, along with recommendations for scholars that are seeking to develop new and relevant knowledge by studying the transformation of Swedish industry, as well as for managers seeking to benchmark their digitalization activities to others.

The identity crisis of sharing: from the co-op economy to the urban sharing economy phenomenon
Book chapterPublication
Geißinger, A., Pelgander, L., & Öberg, C.
Publication year

2021

Published in

In A Modern Guide to the Urban Sharing Economy. Edward Elgar Publishing.

Abstract

This chapter explores the disparities between the two main dimensions of the contemporary Sharing Economy. On the one side, non-market collaborative economy actors are shaping the community orientation. On the other side, the market-oriented platform economy utilizes commercial interest in cities based on the scalability of ‘peer’ users and providers. It is within this tension that the chapter aims to illustrate how today’s sharing economy got into an identity crisis. By drawing on the literature of organizational identity, we utilize five different sharing economy actors across the market/non-market continuum in Sweden to discover who they are and what societal impact they envision. The chapter discusses how over time, sharing economy actors seem to have moved from a co-operative, non-commercial model of sharing to instead focus on a commercial sharing approach in a predominant urban setting. We end the chapter by initiating a general debate about the future of the peer-to-peer sharing idea.

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Geißinger, A., Pelgander, L., & Öberg, C. (2021). The identity crisis of sharing: from the co-op economy to the urban sharing economy phenomenon. In A Modern Guide to the Urban Sharing Economy. Edward Elgar Publishing.

Tracking the Institutional Logics of the Sharing Economy
Book chapterPublication
Geissinger, A., Laurell, C., Öberg, C. & Sandström, C.
Publication year

2019

Abstract

With the radical growth in the ubiquity of digital platforms, the sharing economy is here to stay. This Handbook explores the nature and direction of the sharing economy, interrogating its key dynamics and evolution over the past decade and critiquing its effect on society.
Using an interdisciplinary perspective, this Handbook analyses labour, governance, trust and consumption in the contemporary sharing economy. It questions the apparent contradiction between its components: the moral economy of small-scale communal sharing versus the far-flung reaches of the market economy. Chapters explore ways to resolve this paradox, theorizing hybrid economic forms and considering the replacement of human trust inherent in the sharing economy with a transactional reputation economy. Featuring a variety of both conceptual explorations and empirical investigations in a variety of different cross-cultural contexts, this Handbook illustrates how and, more importantly, why the sharing economy has reshaped marketplaces, and will continue to disrupt them as it develops.
Written in an accessible style, this thorough Handbook offers crucial insights for researchers across a variety of disciplines interested in the trajectories of modern consumption and market development, as well as students studying the sharing economy. Practitioners, policy makers and public speakers working in and around the sharing economy will also benefit from this book’s unique analysis of trends in consumer and market economics.

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