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Recruitment of scarce competences to rural regions: Policy perspectives

PublicationArticle (with peer review)

Abstract

This paper studies the perceived difficulty of recruiting scarce competencies to rural regions. Furthermore, the role of policy in facilitating and enhancing recruitment to and better skills matching in rural regions is discussed. Based on a survey targeted to the business sections of Swedish municipalities, the results show that recruitment is perceived to be difficult in both rural and nonrural regions and that the difficulty of recruiting for the right skills results in a lack of skills matching and constitutes an obstacle to growth. Rural regions located close to urban areas can to some extent mitigate these recruitment problems, and their locations pose less of a barrier in recruitment processes compared to those of remotely located rural regions.

Which policies can help remedy recruitment problems faced in rural regions? In both rural and nonrural regions, incentives for writing off student debt and relocation support for accompanying persons and tandem recruitment are perceived to be the most promising policies. Rural regions are more receptive to the implementation of such policies. Finally, the need for flexibility and policies that can be adapted to the regional demand for labour are stressed.

Nyström, K. Recruitment of scarce competences to rural regions: Policy perspectives. Rev Reg Res (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10037-021-00155-

Based on content

Regional resilience to displacements
Article (with peer review)Publication
Nyström, K.
Publication year

2018

Published in
Abstract

This paper contributes to knowledge about regional resilience to displacement and examines the extent to which the characteristics of the (1) regional closures, (2) individuals in a region, (3) regional industry, (4) regional economy and (5) regional attractiveness influence the re-employment of displaced employees. Regions where the average size of establishment closures is large or the regional displacement rate is high exhibit increased resilience in terms of re-employing displaced employees in the same region. Unrelated and related industrial variety are positively related to resilience to displacement in regions with low re-employment capacities, whereas there is some evidence that regional attractiveness is positively related to resilience in regions with a good ability to re-employ displaced employees in the same region.

Related content: Working paper No. 276

Entrepreneurial Politicians
Article (with peer review)Publication
Nyström, K.
Publication year

2013

Published in
Abstract

This paper explores the entrepreneurial experience (and spirit) of politicians. To what extent have they been involved in entrepreneurial activities? Are politicians more or less entrepreneurial than their voters? Are entrepreneurship policies more or less important to politicians compared to the voters they represent? The Members of the Swedish Parliament were asked the same questions regarding their entrepreneurial activities as found in the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (GEM). The empirical results indicate that when we analyse the statistical significance of the differences and control for individual characteristics, politicians have similar experiences and ambitions to the rest of the population when it comes to entrepreneurial activities. Politicians have a high potential for becoming entrepreneurs in the future, but seem to be less optimistic about how entrepreneurs are perceived in the cultural context. In addition, there is a substantial discrepancy between how politicians and voters perceive the ease of starting and running a business. Unlike politicians, voters do not agree that it is easy to start and run a business in Sweden.

The Importance of Industry Structure in the Analysis of Regional Entry and Exit
Article (with peer review)Publication
Nyström, K.
Publication year

2009

Abstract

Previous empirical research has suggested that a large amount of the regional variation of new firm formation can be explained by differences in industrial structure. This paper studies the regional patterns of entry and exit in Sweden 1997-2001 considering these findings. It is shown that for the country as a whole, on average during these five years between 0.5 and 2.7 percent of the regional variation in entry and exit rates remain to be explained when regional industrial entry and exit rates are compared to the national average. However, there are substantial regional variations, which should be acknowledged by policy-makers.

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