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Regional differences in effects of publicly sponsored R&D grants on SME performance

PublicationArticle (in press)
Företagandets villkor, Företagsstöd, Företagstillväxt, Josefin Videnord, Patrik Gustavsson Tingvall, Regional tillväxt, SMEs

Abstract

This paper explores regional variation in the effects of publicly sponsored R&D grants on SME performance. The results suggest that there is no guarantee that the grants will impact firm growth, either positive or negative. Positive growth effects are most likely to be found for publicly sponsored R&D grants targeting SMEs located in regions abundant with skilled labor, whereas the opposite is found for SMEs located in regions with a limited supply of skilled labor.
Related content: Working paper No. 289

Gustavsson Tingvall, P. & Videnord, J. (2020). Regional differences in effects of publicly sponsored R&D grants on SME performance. Small Business Economics, 54, 951-969. DOI: 10.1007/s11187-018-0085-6


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