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Working Paper No. 138. Immigrants’ Attitudes towards Redistribution

PublicationWorking paper
Andreas Bergh, Attityd, Företagandets villkor, Günther Fink, Migration, Välfärd
Working Paper No. 138.
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Abstract

Using data from the World Value Survey we examine first and second generation immigrants’ attitudes towards income inequality and redistribution. We find that first generation immigrants are on average less favorable to redistribution compared to non-immigrants. This effect is particularly pronounced in the Nordic welfare states, while in residual welfare states immigrants have stronger preferences for more government involvement, but not necessarily towards more redistribution. We find only marginal differences for second generation immigrants, suggesting a rather rapid adaptation of local norms and political preferences.

Bergh, A. & Fink, G. (2009). Immigrants’ Attitudes towards Redistribution: Implications for the Welfare State. Ratio Working Paper No. 138.

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Working Paper No. 138. Immigrants’ Attitudes towards Redistribution
Working paperPublication
Bergh, A. & Fink, G.
Publication year

2009

Published in

Ratio Working Paper

Abstract

Using data from the World Value Survey we examine first and second generation immigrants’ attitudes towards income inequality and redistribution. We find that first generation immigrants are on average less favorable to redistribution compared to non-immigrants. This effect is particularly pronounced in the Nordic welfare states, while in residual welfare states immigrants have stronger preferences for more government involvement, but not necessarily towards more redistribution. We find only marginal differences for second generation immigrants, suggesting a rather rapid adaptation of local norms and political preferences.

Working Paper No. 84. Higher Education: Does Public Expenditure Increase Enrollment?
Working paperPublication
Bergh, A. & Fink, G.
Publication year

2006

Published in

Ratio Working Paper

Abstract

This paper evaluates the effects of public education expenditure on student enrollment in tertiary education. We use a cross-section of 132 countries to demonstrate that public expenditure on primary and secondary education positively affects tertiary enrollment rates, while the generosity of tertiary education subsidies themselves do not appear to have any signifcant impact on tertiary enrollment. The results presented are robust to various specifcations, and raise serious concerns regarding the within country allocation of public resources on education, which seems to be biased towards higher education, especially for less developed countries.

Working Paper No. 84. Higher Education: Does Public Expenditure Increase Enrollment?
Working paperPublication
Bergh, A. & Fink, G.
Publication year

2006

Published in

Ratio Working Paper

Abstract

This paper evaluates the effects of public education expenditure on student enrollment in tertiary education. We use a cross-section of 132 countries to demonstrate that public expenditure on primary and secondary education positively affects tertiary enrollment rates, while the generosity of tertiary education subsidies themselves do not appear to have any signifcant impact on tertiary enrollment. The results presented are robust to various specifcations, and raise serious concerns regarding the within country allocation of public resources on education, which seems to be biased towards higher education, especially for less developed countries.

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