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Working Paper No. 2. Tillväxt och nya och små företag

PublicationWorking paper
Dan Johansson, Entry, Företagandets villkor, Institutionell ekonomi, Size distribution of firms, Småföretagande, Småföretagstillväxt
Working Paper No. 2.
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Abstract

Svensk och internationell forskning har visat att nya och små företag spelar en viktig roll för att skapa industriell utveckling och ekonomisk tillväxt. Det finns dock belägg för att Sverige i ett internationellt perspektiv kännetecknas av en låg nyetableringstakt och en brist på små och snabbväxande företag. En förklaring kan vara att lagar och regler under lång tid försvårat, inom vissa branscher t o m förbjudit, etableringen och expansionen av nya och små företag. I artikeln argumenteras att detta förmodligen är en viktig förklaring till Sveriges sämre ekonomiska utveckling jämfört med andra OECD-länder. Vidare konstateras att avsevärda förbättringar av företagsklimatet, med stor potentiell effekt på den ekonomiska tillväxten, emellertid är möjliga till försumbara, eller så låga, statsfinansiella kostnader att de närmast är att betrakta som samhällsekonomiska ”gratisluncher”.

Johansson, D. (2002). Tillväxt och nya och små företag. Ratio Working Paper No. 2.


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