Search

Working paper No. 216. On the Estimation of Skewed Geometric Stable Distribution

PublicationWorking paper
Daniel Halvarsson, Företagandets villkor, Geometric stable distributions
on_the_estimation_of_skewed_geometric_stable_distributions_wp216
Download

Abstract

The increasing interest in the application of geometric stable distributions has lead to a need for appropriate estimators. Building on recent procedures for estimating the Linnik distribution, this paper develops two estimators for the geometric stable distribution. Closed form expressions are provided for the signed and unsigned fractional moments of the distribution. The estimators are then derived using the methods of fractional lower order moments and that of logarithmic moments. Their performance is tested on simulated data, where the lower order estimators, in particular, are found to give efficient results over most of the parameter space.

Halvarsson, D. (2013). ”On the Estimation of Skewed Geometric Stable Distribution”. Ratio Working paper No. 216.

Based on content

Working paper No. 215. Identifying High-Growth Firms
Working paperPublication
Halvarsson, D
Publication year

2013

Abstract

This paper investigates the role(s) of high-growth firms (HGFs) in the robust growth-rate distribution. HGFs are identified as firms for which the growth-rate distribution exhibits power-law decay. In contrast to the traditional means of identifying HGFs, a distributional approach eliminates the need to specify an arbitrary growth rate or percentage share. The latter approach is illustrated by the growth-rate distribution for Swedish data on incorporated firms at the aggregate level and at the 2-digit industry level. The empirical results indicate that a power law is sometimes present in the growth-rate distribution and suggest that HGFs are rarer than previously thought.

Halvarsson, D. (2013). ”Identifying High-Growth Firms”. Ratio Working paper No. 215.

Working paper No. 215. Identifying High-Growth Firms
Working paperPublication
Halvarsson, D
Publication year

2013

Abstract

This paper investigates the role(s) of high-growth firms (HGFs) in the robust growth-rate distribution. HGFs are identified as firms for which the growth-rate distribution exhibits power-law decay. In contrast to the traditional means of identifying HGFs, a distributional approach eliminates the need to specify an arbitrary growth rate or percentage share. The latter approach is illustrated by the growth-rate distribution for Swedish data on incorporated firms at the aggregate level and at the 2-digit industry level. The empirical results indicate that a power law is sometimes present in the growth-rate distribution and suggest that HGFs are rarer than previously thought.

Halvarsson, D. (2013). ”Identifying High-Growth Firms”. Ratio Working paper No. 215.

Ratio Working Paper No. 349: Industrial conflict in essential services in a new era – Swedish rules in a comparative perspective
Working paperPublication
Karlson, N.
Publication year

2021

Published in

Ratio Working Paper

Abstract

This paper examines whether the Swedish regulatory system of dealing with industrial conflicts that affect essential services need an update or reform. Are the existing rules effective in a world where many essential services are upheld by many interdependent agents in complex systems where every single node becomes critical for the functioning of the system, and where the essential service activities could be either private or public? A comparative study is conducted with the corresponding regulatory systems of the United Kingdom, Germany, and Denmark.
The conclusion is that Sweden is a special case. The Swedish protection against and readiness in dealing with societally harmful industrial conflicts in essential services is weaker than in the countries of comparison. Just as in relation to other threats to essential services, it is not sustainable to claim that just because such a threat is not currently present, there would be no need for preparedness.
There are many alternative ways to handle this. Desirable methods should both prevent harmful conflicts from erupting and end conflicts that have grown harmful to society at a later stage. The labour market organisations should have a mutual interest in reforming the rules.

Show more