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Working paper No. 226. Redirecting International Trade

PublicationWorking paper
Ari Kokko, Bengt Söderlund, Export, Företagandets villkor, Institutionell ekonomi, Internationell handel, Konflikter, Offshoring, Patrik Tingvall
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Abstract

The global financial crisis has accelerated the redirection of trade towards new markets, outside the OECD area, where both demand patterns and the institutional environment differ from those in the OECD. This study provides an empirical examination of the consequences of this shift. Results suggest that weak institutions hamper trade and reduces the length of trade relations, especially for small firms. Furthermore, trade in industries that are characterized by a high degree of trade conflicts and that requires extensive relationship specific investments for trade to occur are comparatively difficult to redirect towards markets with weak institutions.

Related content: Redirecting International Trade: Contracts, Conflicts, and Institutions

Kokko, A., Söderlund, B. & Gustavsson Tingvall, P. (2013). ”Redirecting International Trade: Contracts, Conflicts, and Institutions”. Ratio Working paper No. 226.


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