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Working Paper No. 43. Islam and the Institutions of a Free Society: Many Problems, Little Hope

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Företagandets villkor, Kultur, Marknadsekonomi, Rättssäkerhet, Stefan Voigt, Värderingar
Working Paper No. 43.
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Abstract

The rule of law, constitutional democracy, and market economy are taken as the core institutions of free societies. After arguing that shared values heavily influence institutions, it is asked whether Islamic values are conducive to those institutions. The values are ascertained via the economic ethics of Islam as lived today and the attitudes of some Muslim populations via the analysis of a recent opinion poll. Neither the values nor the attitudes of Muslim societies seem particularly supportive of the institutions of a free society.

Related content: Islam and the Institutions of a Free Society

Voigt, S. (2004). Islam and the Institutions of a Free Society: Many Problems, Little Hope. Ratio Working Paper No. 43.

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Working Paper No. 43. Islam and the Institutions of a Free Society: Many Problems, Little Hope
Working paperPublication
Voigt, S.
Publication year

2004

Abstract

The rule of law, constitutional democracy, and market economy are taken as the core institutions of free societies. After arguing that shared values heavily influence institutions, it is asked whether Islamic values are conducive to those institutions. The values are ascertained via the economic ethics of Islam as lived today and the attitudes of some Muslim populations via the analysis of a recent opinion poll. Neither the values nor the attitudes of Muslim societies seem particularly supportive of the institutions of a free society.

Related content: Islam and the Institutions of a Free Society

Islam and the Institutions of a Free Society
Artikel (med peer review)Publication
Voigt, S.
Publication year

2005

Published in
Abstract

Most Muslim countries do not rank highly on the rule of law, constitutional democracy, and economic freedom—perhaps because these institutions of a free society are not revered in Islamic thought. Some of the attitudes Muslims express in opinion polls, however, are surprisingly compatible with at least some of the central preconditions for these core institutions.

Related content: Working Paper No. 43

Working Paper No. 43. Islam and the Institutions of a Free Society: Many Problems, Little Hope
Working paperPublication
Voigt, S.
Publication year

2004

Abstract

The rule of law, constitutional democracy, and market economy are taken as the core institutions of free societies. After arguing that shared values heavily influence institutions, it is asked whether Islamic values are conducive to those institutions. The values are ascertained via the economic ethics of Islam as lived today and the attitudes of some Muslim populations via the analysis of a recent opinion poll. Neither the values nor the attitudes of Muslim societies seem particularly supportive of the institutions of a free society.

Related content: Islam and the Institutions of a Free Society

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