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Working Paper No. 44. The Theory of the Firm and the Markets for Strategic Acquisitions

PublicationWorking paper
Åsa Eliasson, Experimentell ekonomi, Företagandets villkor, Gunnar Eliasson, Kompetensblock
Working Paper No. 44.
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Abstract

Five problems are addressed: (1) the role of competent actors in the venture capital and exit markets supporting the industrialization of winning technologies in small innovative firms, (2) the competence of the large firm to integrate large-scale operational efficiency with small-scale innovative capability through distributed development work and integrated production and (3) the importance of viable markets for strategic acquisitions, both in making this possible and in allowing a flexible choice for the small firm between growing aggressively on its own through own acquisitions, or being acquired strategically itself. We (4) find that the less developed markets in continental Europe may be a disadvantage compared to the US in ushering in a future New Economy. We finally (5) discuss what becomes of the Coasian theory of the firm when production is constantly outsourced in, or insourced from the market as the relative efficiency of coordination through management and over the market changes.

Eliasson, G. & Eliasson, Å. (2004). The Theory of the Firm and the Markets for Strategic Acquisitions. Ratio Working Paper No. 44.

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Working Paper No. 97. The Pharmacia Story of Entrepreneurship and as a Creative Technical University – An Experiment in Innovation, Organizational Break Up and Industrial Renaissance
Working paperPublication
Eliasson, G. & Eliasson, Å.
Publication year

2006

Abstract

While innovative technology supply has been the focus of much neo Schumpeterian modeling, few have addressed the critical and more resource demanding commercializing of the same technologies. The result may have been a growth policy focused on the wrong problem. Using competence bloc theory and a firm based macro to macro approach we abandon the assumed linear relation between technology change and economic growth of such models, and demonstrate that lack of local commercialization competences is likely to block growth even though innovative technology supplies are abundant. The break up, reorganization and part withdrawal of Pharmacia from the local Uppsala (in Sweden) economy after a series of international mergers illustrate. Pharmacia has “released” a wealth of technologies in local markets. Local commercialization competence, notably industrially competent financing has, however, not been sufficient to fill in through indigenous entrepreneurship the vacuum left by Pharmacia. Only thanks to foreign investors, attracted by Pharmacia technologies, that have opted to stay for the long term the local Uppsala economy seems to be heading for a successful future. The Pharmacia case also demonstrates the role of advanced firms as “technical universities” and the nature of an experimentally organized economy (EOE) in which business mistakes are a natural learning cost for economic development.

Related content: The Pharmacia Story of Entrepreneurship and as a Creative Technical University

Working Paper No. 97. The Pharmacia Story of Entrepreneurship and as a Creative Technical University – An Experiment in Innovation, Organizational Break Up and Industrial Renaissance
Working paperPublication
Eliasson, G. & Eliasson, Å.
Publication year

2006

Abstract

While innovative technology supply has been the focus of much neo Schumpeterian modeling, few have addressed the critical and more resource demanding commercializing of the same technologies. The result may have been a growth policy focused on the wrong problem. Using competence bloc theory and a firm based macro to macro approach we abandon the assumed linear relation between technology change and economic growth of such models, and demonstrate that lack of local commercialization competences is likely to block growth even though innovative technology supplies are abundant. The break up, reorganization and part withdrawal of Pharmacia from the local Uppsala (in Sweden) economy after a series of international mergers illustrate. Pharmacia has “released” a wealth of technologies in local markets. Local commercialization competence, notably industrially competent financing has, however, not been sufficient to fill in through indigenous entrepreneurship the vacuum left by Pharmacia. Only thanks to foreign investors, attracted by Pharmacia technologies, that have opted to stay for the long term the local Uppsala economy seems to be heading for a successful future. The Pharmacia case also demonstrates the role of advanced firms as “technical universities” and the nature of an experimentally organized economy (EOE) in which business mistakes are a natural learning cost for economic development.

Related content: The Pharmacia Story of Entrepreneurship and as a Creative Technical University

Working Paper No. 46. Competence in Health Care – An Industrial Systems Analysis Using Competence Bloc Theory to Compare European and US Health Care
Working paperPublication
Eliasson, G. & Eliasson, Å.
Publication year

2004

Published in

Ratio Working Paper

Abstract

While European health care systems are mostly public and similar the contrast is large to the US health industry based to a large extent in the market. Using competence bloc theory the industrial potential of Swedish and European health care is assessed and compared with US health industry. To get the the analysis properly framed health industry is defined to include health insurance, health care and the supporting biotech, pharmaceutical and medical instrument industries. A gradually aging industrialized world makes wealthy customers demand the sophisticated life quality enhancing medical support new technology offers. The overwhelming influence of substitute customership in Europe, through politicians, social insurance, doctors etc., however, holds back development through suppressing the preferences of the true customer (the patient), discouraging innovative product competition and entrepreneurship. The larger part of cost escalation in US health care can be attributed to quality improvements, and luxury health care has stimulated innovative product development. While Swedish health care so far has been a technological winner, commercial competence to become internationally competitive is lacking. It appears politically difficult to recognize that private for profit health care may be both more efficient and profitable than publicly run services. However, once competition for profit has been introduced public providers have to improve performance and the differences will disappear.

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