Search

Social media analytics for knowledge acquisition of market and non-market perceptions in the sharing economy

PublicationArticle (with peer review)
Andrea Geissinger, Christian Sandström, Christina Öberg, Christoffer Laurell, sharing economy, Sociala medier

Abstract

Purpose
Using the case of Foodora, this paper aims to assess the impact of technological innovation of an emerging actor in the sharing economy through stakeholders’ perceptions in the market and non-market domains.

Design/methodology/approach
Using a methodological approach called social media analytics (SMA) to explore the case of Foodora, 3,250 user-generated contents in social media are systematically gathered, coded and analysed.

Findings
The findings indicate that, while Foodora appears to be a viable provider in the marketplace, there is mounting public concern about the working conditions of its employees. In the market domain, Foodora manages its status as an online delivery platform and provider well, but at the same time, it struggles with its position in the non-market sphere, suggesting that the firm is vulnerable to regulatory change. These insights highlight the importance of simultaneously exploring and balancing market and non-market perceptions when assessing the impact of disruptive innovation.

Originality/value
This study offers originality by providing an integrative approach to consider both the market and non-market domains. It is also novel in its use of SMA as a tool for knowledge acquisition and management to evaluate the impact of emerging technologies in the sharing economy.

Geissinger, A., Laurell, C., Öberg, C., Sandström, C., Sick, N. & Yuliano, S. (2021). Social media analytics for knowledge acquisition of market and non-market perceptions in the sharing economy. Journal of Knowledge Management, 25(2), 500-512.


Similar content

Platforms in Liquid Modernity: Essays about the Sharing Economy, Digital Platforms, and Institutions
BookPublication
Geissinger, A.
Publication year

2021

Published in

(PhD dissertation, Örebro University).

Abstract

The year 2020 feels like the beginning of a crescendo of change. As environmental and social challenges reach an all-time high, the organization of our societies is coming under scrutiny. We, as a society, turn to technology to reinvent the organization of social life after disruptive episodes. Inspired by Bauman’s theorizing to describe the cultural and societal zeitgeist, this thesis explains the institutionalization of one of the most promising alternative forms of organization of the past decade: the sharing economy.

Comprised of nine essays centered around three focal areas: (1) Organizational change, (2) Market change, and (3) Societal change, this thesis aims to explain the institutionalization of digital sharing platforms in liquid modern society.

This thesis finds that digital sharing platforms act as societal organizers on several dimensions of “in-betweenness.” As this moment in time can also be characterized as a period of “interregnum”—another moment of in-betweenness—where old structures are continuously disrupted but no clear new path has emerged, digital platform providers fill a structural void in our highly individualized society. Digital platform providers use community as an anchor, a belief, and sets of practices to create an emerging (intermediary) institution around which different forms of organization manifest.

Digital sharing platforms have, however, remained a grace note on systemic change: ornamental and practically non-essential. Still, digital platforms are setting new norms in all areas of organizational, market, and societal life. By evoking both elements of community and market, digital platforms are playing an important part in creating a symphony of our future societal order.

Trust and the sharing economy
Article (with peer review)Publication
Pelgander, L., Öberg, C., & Barkenäs, L.
Publication year

(2022).

Published in

Digital Business, 100048.

Abstract

Trust is intimately connected with relational interactions, but does it also have a role to play in transactional exchanges? How would it differ? While trust has been discussed extensively in sharing economy research, the focus has been on trust cues created in exchanges between strangers, thereby approaching trust empirically rather than theoretically. Focusing on user trust, this paper investigates how trust constructs from relational interactions manifest in the sharing economy. This paper bridges sharing economy research with trust as a theoretical construct to investigate the well-established variables of ability, benevolence and integrity as components of trust in the sharing economy. The paper is based on a questionnaire survey of 175 users of Uber’s co-driving service UberPop. Descriptive and regression analyses were conducted focusing on user trust in the platform and providers. The findings indicate how trust in transactional exchanges is shaped differently compared with trust in relational interactions. User trust in providers, which diminishes over time, is based on emotional traits, while user trust in the platform is based on functional components. The platform and providers thereby complement each other in terms of the trust created. This paper contributes to research on trust by focusing on trust in transactional exchanges, and to research on the sharing economy by investigating trust based on theoretical constructs.

Industrial Marketing
BookPublication
Fotiadis, T., Lindgreen, A., Siomkos, G. J., Öberg, C., & Folinas, D.
Publication year

2022

Published in

Industrial Marketing. SAGE.

Abstract

An introductory textbook on industrial marketing and supply chain management that discusses industrial products and pricing, as well as key topics such as co-creation of value, big data, innovation, green practices and CSR.

The textbook includes:

The marketing philosophy on industrial markets
The characteristics of industrial markets
The marketing mix and the product life cycle
The issues surrounding distribution and operations including value creation, business relationships and networks
Case studies and mini case studies (vignettes)

This textbook is suitable for students studying industrial marketing and other related courses at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Thomas Fotiadis is an Associate Professor of Marketing and Head of the Marketing Laboratory in the Department of Production and Management Engineering, School of Engineering at Democritus University of Thrace, Greece.

Adam Lindgreen is Professor and Head of Department of Marketing at Copenhagen Business School, Denmark and Extraordinary Professor at University of Pretoria’s Gordon Institute of Business Science, South Africa.

George J. Siomkos is Professor of Marketing at the Athens University of Economics & Business (AUEB), Director of the MSc Program in Services Management and previously Dean of the School of Business, AUEB, Greece.

Christina Öberg is Professor at CTF Service Research Center, Karlstad University and associated with the Ratio Institute, Sweden. 

Dimitris Folinas is Professor in the Department of Supply Chain Management at International Hellenic University, Greece.

Show more

Bankgiro: 512-6578