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Working paper No 268: Innovation Capabilities and Financing Constraints of Family Firms

PublicationWorking paper
Andreas Stephan, Familjeföretag, Financing of Innovations, Företagandets villkor, Innovation, Nationalekonomi
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Abstract

Using the 2007 Mannheim innovation survey, we investigate whether family firms are more financially constrained than other firms and how this affects both innovation input as well as innovation outcomes such as market and firm novelties or process innovations. Based on the CDM framework, estimation of the recursive system of equations shows that family businesses are more likely to be constrained and have, on average, lower innovation input. Surprisingly, however, this does not reduce their innovation outcomes as, on average, family firms have the same level of innovation outcomes as nonfamily firms.

Schäfer, D., Stephan, A., & Solórzano Mosquera, J. (2016). Innovation Capabilities and Financing Constraints of Family Firms. Ratio Working Paper No. 268. Stockholm: Ratio.


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