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Ratio Working Paper No. 258: Effects of work-based learning on companies involved in VET education

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Företagandets villkor, Företagsutveckling, Kompetens, Kompetens för tillväxt, Kristine Persson, Nationalekonomi, Nils Karlson
Ratio Working Paper No. 258
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Abstract

The paper studies the effects on companies from taking on apprentices for work-based learning. What are the benefits and costs that can be identified? In a series of semi-structured in-depth interviews with companies and school representatives, we study the effects of work-based learning at five Swedish companies that run their own VET schools. Our overall conclusion is that there are significant net benefits to the companies themselves, primarily through lower recruitment costs but also through positive effects on the skills of supervisors and other staff, as well as of the companies’ brand and community commitment. These long-term benefits clearly outweigh the short-turn cost of time-loss and strenuous for staff to supervise the trainees.

Karlson, N. & Persson, K. (2015). Effects of work-based learning on companies involved in VET education. Ratio Working Paper No. 258.

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Ratio Working Paper No. 258: Effects of work-based learning on companies involved in VET education
Working paperPublication
Karlson, N. & Persson, K.
Publication year

2015

Published in

Ratio Working Paper

Abstract

The paper studies the effects on companies from taking on apprentices for work-based learning. What are the benefits and costs that can be identified? In a series of semi-structured in-depth interviews with companies and school representatives, we study the effects of work-based learning at five Swedish companies that run their own VET schools. Our overall conclusion is that there are significant net benefits to the companies themselves, primarily through lower recruitment costs but also through positive effects on the skills of supervisors and other staff, as well as of the companies’ brand and community commitment. These long-term benefits clearly outweigh the short-turn cost of time-loss and strenuous for staff to supervise the trainees.

Ratio Working Paper No. 258: Effects of work-based learning on companies involved in VET education
Working paperPublication
Karlson, N. & Persson, K.
Publication year

2015

Published in

Ratio Working Paper

Abstract

The paper studies the effects on companies from taking on apprentices for work-based learning. What are the benefits and costs that can be identified? In a series of semi-structured in-depth interviews with companies and school representatives, we study the effects of work-based learning at five Swedish companies that run their own VET schools. Our overall conclusion is that there are significant net benefits to the companies themselves, primarily through lower recruitment costs but also through positive effects on the skills of supervisors and other staff, as well as of the companies’ brand and community commitment. These long-term benefits clearly outweigh the short-turn cost of time-loss and strenuous for staff to supervise the trainees.

Ratio Working Paper No. 349: Industrial conflict in essential services in a new era – Swedish rules in a comparative perspective
Working paperPublication
Karlson, N.
Publication year

2021

Published in

Ratio Working Paper

Abstract

This paper examines whether the Swedish regulatory system of dealing with industrial conflicts that affect essential services need an update or reform. Are the existing rules effective in a world where many essential services are upheld by many interdependent agents in complex systems where every single node becomes critical for the functioning of the system, and where the essential service activities could be either private or public? A comparative study is conducted with the corresponding regulatory systems of the United Kingdom, Germany, and Denmark.
The conclusion is that Sweden is a special case. The Swedish protection against and readiness in dealing with societally harmful industrial conflicts in essential services is weaker than in the countries of comparison. Just as in relation to other threats to essential services, it is not sustainable to claim that just because such a threat is not currently present, there would be no need for preparedness.
There are many alternative ways to handle this. Desirable methods should both prevent harmful conflicts from erupting and end conflicts that have grown harmful to society at a later stage. The labour market organisations should have a mutual interest in reforming the rules.

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