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Internal migration and human capital theory: To what extent is it selective?

PublikationArtikel (med peer review)
A. V. William Clark, Arbetskraftens rörlighet, Företagandets villkor, Martin Korpi, Migration

Sammanfattning

Empirical studies of internal labor migration, modelling average outcomes, suggest migrants move to enhance returns to their labor. In contrast, major international surveys show less than a third of internal migrants as motivated by employment reasons. Using Swedish panel data for the years 2001-2009, this paper addresses this disconnect by examining the full distribution of migrant income changes. Results from initial CEM matching and quantile regression suggest that large returns to internal migration are mostly captured by the higher educated, those initially low in the income distribution and those heading into the largest metropolitan regions. Much if not most of migration outcomes are however a wash and indeed often negative in terms of pay-off. This suggests models of average outcomes as insufficient in addressing human capital motivated migration.

Related content: Working paper No. 244

Korpi, M. & Clark, W. A. V. (2015). Internal migration and human capital theory: To what extent is it selective?Economics Letters, 136: 31-34. DOI: 10.1016/j.econlet.2015.08.016

Baserat på innehåll

Ratio Working Paper No. 256: Migration, Careers and the Urban Wage Premium: Does Human Capital Matter?
Working paperPublikation
Korpi, M. & Clark, W. A. V.
Publiceringsår

2015

Sammanfattning

Using detailed Swedish full population data on regional migrants, this paper addresses the question of whether the urban wage premium, and “thick” labor market matching effects, are found only among the higher educated or across all educational groups, and whether the urban population threshold for these type of effects varies by educational category. Estimating initial wages, average wage level and wage growth 2001-2009, we find similar matching effects for all educational groups in the three largest metropolitan areas, but very weak effects for cities ranked 4th – 6th in the urban hierarchy. Our findings suggest that positive urban matching effects are not limited to those with higher education, but that there are distinct population thresholds for these type of effects, regardless of educational background.

Related content: Migration and Occupational Careers

Ratio Working Paper No. 256: Migration, Careers and the Urban Wage Premium: Does Human Capital Matter?
Working paperPublikation
Korpi, M. & Clark, W. A. V.
Publiceringsår

2015

Sammanfattning

Using detailed Swedish full population data on regional migrants, this paper addresses the question of whether the urban wage premium, and “thick” labor market matching effects, are found only among the higher educated or across all educational groups, and whether the urban population threshold for these type of effects varies by educational category. Estimating initial wages, average wage level and wage growth 2001-2009, we find similar matching effects for all educational groups in the three largest metropolitan areas, but very weak effects for cities ranked 4th – 6th in the urban hierarchy. Our findings suggest that positive urban matching effects are not limited to those with higher education, but that there are distinct population thresholds for these type of effects, regardless of educational background.

Related content: Migration and Occupational Careers

Ratio Working Paper No. 244: Internal Migration and Human Capital Theory: To What Extent Is It Selective
Working paperPublikation
Korpi, M. & Clark, W. A. V.
Publiceringsår

2014

Sammanfattning

Empirical studies of international labor migration, modelling average outcomes, suggest migrants move to enhance returns to their labor. In contrast, major international surveys show less than a third of internal migrants as motivated by employment reasons. Using Swedish panel data for the years 2001-2009, this paper addresses this disconnect by examining the full distribution of migrant income changes. Results from initial CEM matching and quantile regression suggest that large returns to internal migration are mostly captured by the higher educated. Much if not most of migration outcomes are however a wash and indeed often negative in terms of pay – off. This suggests models of average outcomes as insufficient in addressing human capital motivated migration.

Related content: Internal Migration and Human Capital Theory: To What Extent Is It Selective

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