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Sociology and Classical Liberalism

PublikationArtikel (med peer review)
Charlotta Stern, Daniel Klein, Företagandets villkor, Liberalism, Sociologi

Sammanfattning

We advocate the development of a classical-liberal character in sociology. Even social democrats should recognize classical liberalism as a venerable tradition. They should recognize that its antistatist sensibilities remain a vibrant and valuable part of the general political culture. To say that classical liberalism is underrepresented in sociology would be a vast understatement. Forbidden might be more fitting. The lack of classical liberalism, in our view, has worked to the detriment of sociology and the public purposes that sociology presumably should be fulfilling. First, we relate recent controversies within the sociology profession to show that some sociologists are very critical of the profession’s ideological character. Second, we summarize the results of our survey of ASA members, providing hard data that shows the almost complete absence of classical liberals in the organization. Third, we sketch a few substantive ideas to indicate the promise
of classical-liberal sociology.

Related content: Working Paper No. 81

Klein, D.B. & Stern, C. (2006). ”Sociology and Classical Liberalism.”The Independent Review, 11(1): 37-52.

Baserat på innehåll

Political Diversity in Six Disciplines
Artikel (med peer review)Publikation
Klein, D.B. & Stern, C.
Publiceringsår

2005

Sammanfattning

The inclination toward the political left in the American academy has existed as a presumption for decades. Recently, faculty and students, who found themselves marginalized by reason of the party they support or their religious convictions, have been advancing the cause of intellectual diversity. Their appeal would seem compelling, given the mission of higher education, but it has met opposition in an institution where diversity is defined as sex and race preferences that outweigh alternate considerations in admissions, hiring, and other areas. Until recently, one impediment to their push for intellectual diversity has been the lack of an adequately rigorous body of research to identify and quantify the presumed political imbalance to which they were responding. Daniel Klein et al. have now provided that research base in two studies of faculty affiliation. The first, a nationwide survey of six fields in the humanities, and the second, of party registration of faculty at two schools in California, reveal that an overwhelming and monolithic majority of professors support the Democratic Party. Republicans, conservatives, and libertarians constitute a negligible minority. Klein’s revelations received broad media coverage after an 18 November 2004 New York Times article (A23) directed readers to the data and conclusions via the NAS web site at www.nas.org. The two studies appear formally in print below for the first time.

Related content: Working Paper No. 53

Professors and Their Politics: The Policy Views of Social Scientists
Artikel (med peer review)Publikation
Klein, D.B. & Stern, C.
Publiceringsår

2005

Publicerat i
Sammanfattning

Academic social scientists overwhelmingly vote Democratic, and the Democratic hegemony has increased significantly since 1970. Moreover, the policy preferences of a large sample of the members of the scholarly associations in anthropology, economics, history, legal and political philosophy, political sci- ence, and sociology generally bear out conjectures about the correspondence of partisan identification with left/right ideal types; although across the board, both Democratic and Republican academics favor government action more than the ideal types might suggest. Variations in policy views among Democrats is smaller than among Republicans. Ideological diversity (as judged not only by voting behavior, but by policy views) is by far the greatest within economics. Social scientists who deviate from left-wing views are as likely to be libertarian as conservative.

Sociology and Classical Liberalism
Article (with peer review)Publikation
Klein, D.B. & Stern, C.
Publiceringsår

2006

Sammanfattning

We advocate the development of a classical-liberal character in sociology. Even social democrats should recognize classical liberalism as a venerable tradition. They should recognize that its antistatist sensibilities remain a vibrant and valuable part of the general political culture. To say that classical liberalism is underrepresented in sociology would be a vast understatement. Forbidden might be more fitting. The lack of classical liberalism, in our view, has worked to the detriment of sociology and the public purposes that sociology presumably should be fulfilling. First, we relate recent controversies within the sociology profession to show that some sociologists are very critical of the profession’s ideological character. Second, we summarize the results of our survey of ASA members, providing hard data that shows the almost complete absence of classical liberals in the organization. Third, we sketch a few substantive ideas to indicate the promise
of classical-liberal sociology.

Related content: Working Paper No. 81

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